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Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land

Ben Dor A.
Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land
  • (worth a detour)
  • 1-2 km
  • Moderate
  • Average
  • 2 hours
  • 2 2

A spring whose waters emerges from an underground cavern

Ein Mabu'a Wadi Quelt National Park
It is recommended to bring along your food. There is a small kiosk at the site selling drinks and snacks.
Winter in the Holy Land is the best time to make dessert tours. Bring a hat, good walking shoes, water, camera and goodwill are essentials for a fruitful visit.
US$ 300 P/D
Transportation, accommodation, food, tips and entrance fees to sites excluded.

Ein Mabu’a (Ein Al-Fawar)

 

If you have already reached Wadi Qelt to visit Chariton’s monastery, it is recommended to take a hike further downstream and visit Ein Mabu’a, one of nature’s wonders and some of the lauras situated above it.

 

The Arabic name of the spring, Ein Fawar (bubbling), illustrates its character. Ein Mabu’a is a rhythmic bubbling spring, i.e., a spring whose waters emerges from an underground cavern that overflows according to the water level in the cave. The water gushing out of the spring fills a quadratic pool built around the spring. From one leap to the next, the pool empties itself suddenly and the water quickly disappears into the ground. It is, in fact, a “beat cycle” of the spring, and watching it is a fascinating spectacle.

 

How does this happen? The spring emerges from a large inner cavity in a rock. A cave was created by water dissolving the limestone. In this spring there is a thin tubular shaped open space at the top of the cave. The water infiltrates the soil filling the cavity, and when the water level reaches the top to open air, they pour out. Due to the high water pressure in the cave the outer air sucks them out, according to the law of connected vessels, the water in the cave bubbles out. After the spring empties itself it dries up and he will return to arise only after the cavern is filled again.

 

The frequency of beats is not fixed and depends on the amount of rainfall. After heavy rains, the spring may flow endlessly. On the other hand, in drought conditions, it may dry out completely.

 

In the quadratic pool a concrete circle is visible and in it remains a pump built by the British during the Mandate for Palestine. In 1927 the British who took advantage of waters of Ein Prat and pumped them up the Prat River to Jerusalem. As Jerusalem continued to develop, the British built another pumping station in 1931 in Ein Mabu’a transferred them to the station in Ein Prat and from there to Jerusalem. Both pump buildings are used today as offices for the Reserve Rangers and Parks Authority.

 

Near the fountain are a nice grove of eucalyptus trees, benches, tables and a small kiosk selling snacks, drinks, and ice cream. There are clean toilets at the site.



Opening hours

08:00 - 17:00

How to get there

By guided tour only.

More Pictures

  • Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land
    Ben Dor A.
  • Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land
    Ben Dor A.
  • Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land
    Ben Dor A.
  • Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land
    Ben Dor A.
Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land Ein Mabu’a, The Holy Land

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