London Walking Tour: A Fun Day Activity For Kids

 

Get lost in London is a game suitable for kids of the age of six or above. It is designed as a city tour game with some riddles and interesting facts about the city of London. Playing a game is a great way to explore the city and its most famous sites.

 

There are 10 sites located not far from one another, marked with the numbers from 1 to 10. Use a map to locate the sites and solve the riddle when you reach each site. Take your time to explore the beautiful city of London and let the game be your tour guide for the day.

 

1. WESTMINISTER BRIDGE

How many boats can you see on the river?

 

Photo by subherwal on Foter.com

Photo by subherwal on Foter.com

Did you know?

From the bridge, you can see The London Eye, known for sponsorship reasons as the Coca-Cola London Eye. London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. The structure is 443 feet (135 m) tall. When it opened to the public in 2000 it was the world’s tallest Ferris wheel.

 

2. BIG BEN

How tall do you think is the clock tower?

 

Photo on Foter.com

Photo on Foter.com

Did you know?

Big Ben is the nickname for the Great Bell of the clock. The official name of the tower in which Big Ben is located was originally the Clock Tower, but it was renamed Elizabeth Tower in 2012. A great sense of ceremony surrounded its arrival in London. It was brought down the Thames River and then taken across Westminster Bridge by a carriage drawn by 16 white horses. When it was finished in 1859, its clock was the largest and most accurate four-faced striking clock in the world.

 

3. WESTMINSTER ABBEY

How many windows do you think are there in the whole building?

 

Photo by Norbert Reimer on Foter.com

Photo by Norbert Reimer on Foter.com

Did you know?

Westminster Abbey also called the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is a large, mainly Gothic abbey church. It is one of the United Kingdom’s most notable religious buildings and the traditional place of coronation and burial site for British monarchs. Westminster Abbey’s College Garden is one of the oldest gardens in England. In the past, it was used by the monks to grow medicinal herbs and food.

 

4. STATUE OF WINSTON CHURCHILL

How old do you think is Churchill as represented by the statue?

 

Photo by Son of Groucho on Foter.com

Photo by Son of Groucho on Foter.com

Did you know?

Winston Churchill (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was a Prime Minister of the United Kingdom two times. As Prime Minister, he led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Before his death, Churchill himself picked the spot where he wanted his statue to be.

 

5. TRAFALGAR SQUARE

How many red double-deckers can you see around?

 

Photo by trombone65 (PhotoArt Laatzen) on Foter.com

Photo by trombone65 (PhotoArt Laatzen) on Foter.com

Did you know?

Trafalgar Square used to be famous as a home for thousands of pigeons. A popular activity of the visitors was to feed them. In 2003 London mayor declared war on the pigeons and banned feeding them (and the selling of feed near the square). Slowly, the square began to depopulate and now it’s pretty much pigeon free. Also, now that it’s pigeon free, they’re able to hold concerts and public events in the square.

 

6. ADMIRALTY ARCH

Can you find a small nose on the inside wall of the northernmost arch?

 

Photo by Transport Pixels on Foter.com

Photo by Transport Pixels on Foter.com

Did you know?

Admiralty Arch is important as the ceremonial entrance from Trafalgar Square to the ceremonial road leading up to Buckingham Palace. This is the reason the Arch plays an important role on ceremonial occasions as royal weddings, funerals, coronations and other public processions such as the 2012 processions at the end of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Interesting is that the central archway is reserved for use by royalty only.

 

7. KING GEORGE VI & QUEEN ELIZABETH MEMORIAL

Who had a longer life, King George VI or Queen Elizabeth?

 

By Charlie Dave, via Wikimedia Commons

By Charlie Dave, via Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

George VI and Queen Elizabeth were the King and Queen of England before the present Queen, their daughter, Queen Elizabeth II. Queen Elizabeth is known now as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother to avoid confusion with her daughter.

 

8. ST JAMES’S PARK

Can you name 5 different plants and 5 different animals that you can see in the park?

 

Photo by garryknight on Foter.com

Photo by garryknight on Foter.com

Did you know?

The park has a small lake, St James’s Park Lake, with two islands on it. A resident colony of pelicans has been living in the park since a Russian ambassador donated the birds in 1664. While most of the time their wings are clipped, there is a pelican who can be occasionally seen flying to the London Zoo in hopes of getting another meal.

 

9. VICTORIA MEMORIAL

How many lions can you see around?

 

By kaʁstn Disk/Cat, from Wikimedia Commons

By kaʁstn Disk/Cat, from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

The Victoria Memorial was built in Queen Victoria’s honor. The statue sits directly in front of Buckingham Palace and stands more than 82 feet (25 meters) tall. The monument is a memory of the Queen who ruled from 1837 until 1901 when she died. The Victoria Memorial is made of more than just one sculpture of Victoria. Although she is the largest and most central figure, the sculpture also displays a bronze image of the Angel of Truth and the Angel of Justice.

 

There are also many other sculptures that surround the Queen and the enclosing wall. All around the center, there is a nautical theme complete with ships, mermaids, and other marine life. Beautiful bronze statues of lions and symbols of peace descend the stairs. The bronze lions were a gift from New Zealand to honor the Queen.

 

10. BUCKINGHAM PALACE

What kind of flag can you see on the pole?

 

By Diliff, from Wikimedia Commons

By Diliff, from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

Buckingham Palace is the London residence and administrative headquarters of the monarch of the United Kingdom. This is the place where the Queen lives. When the Queen is at home, you can see her red, yellow and blue royal flag flying from the flagpole on top of Buckingham Palace. This flag is called the Royal Standard.

 

The palace is not just a home to royalty but more than 800 members of staff also live there, including a flagman, fendersmith and clockmaker. The latter must keep busy, as the palace contains 350 clocks and watches.

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