Philadelphia Walking Tour: A Fun Day Activity For Kids

 

Get lost in Philadelphia is a game suitable for kids of the age of six or above. It is designed as a city tour game with some riddles and interesting facts about the city of Philadelphia. Playing a game is a great way to explore the city and its most famous sites.

 

There are 10 sites located not far from one another, marked with the numbers from 1 to 10. Use a map to locate the sites and solve the riddle when you reach each site. Take your time to explore the beautiful city of Philadelphia and let the game be your tour guide for the day.

 

1. Philadelphia City Hall

What can you see at the top of the City Hall tower?

 

Photo by jasonmurphyphotography on Foter.com

Photo by jasonmurphyphotography on Foter.com

Did you know?

Philadelphia City Hall is the seat of the government for the city of Philadelphia. The building was constructed from 1871 to 1901 on the Penn Square. At 548 ft. (167 m) the City Hall was the tallest habitable building in the world from 1894 to 1908. In 1976 it was designated a National Historic Landmark.

 

2. Masonic Temple

How many columns are surrounding the main doors of the Masonic Temple?

 

By Jersey856, from Wikimedia Commons

By Jersey856, from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

The Masonic Temple is a historic building located directly across from Philadelphia City Hall. The Temple is now the headquarters for the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, and it serves as the meeting place for 28 Philadelphia lodges. The Temple also features the Masonic Library and Museum of Pennsylvania and receives thousands of visitors every year.

 

3. Reading Terminal Market

What is the most delicious food you can find in the market?

 

Photo by davidwilson1949 on Foter.com

Photo by davidwilson1949 on Foter.com

Did you know?

Reading Terminal Market is an enclosed public market that opened in 1893 under the elevated train shed of the Reading Railroad Company after the city of Philadelphia decided to move public markets from the streets into indoor facilities for both safety and sanitary reasons. Today the market still occupies the ground floor and basement levels of the Reading Terminal’s former train shed. Over one hundred merchants offer fresh produce, meats, fish, artisan cheese, groceries, ice cream, flowers, grilled cheese, baked goods, crafts, books, clothing, and many more.

 

4. Franklin Square

What is located in the middle of the park?

 

By Darian3425, from Wikimedia Commons

By Darian3425, from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

Franklin Square is one of the five original open-space parks planned by William Penn in 1682. Originally, the park was a place intended for medication and relaxation. In the 1920s, the park was abandoned and the surrounding area became locally known as the “tenderloin”, with a district featuring taverns and bordellos, and became a place for homeless individuals resulting in its reputation as Philadelphia’s “skid row”. In 2003, Historic Philadelphia, Inc. renovated the park and helped to get it back to its originality. Tourists are now able to enjoy the renovated park, family-friendly attractions, and the surrounding nature.

 

5. Elfreth’s Alley

What are the biggest differences between this street and the city streets you visited before?

 

Photo by KathrynW1 on Foter.com

Photo by KathrynW1 on Foter.com

Did you know?

Elfreth’s Alley is a historic street in Philadelphia, built in 1702. It is referred to as “the oldest residential street in the USA”.Today there are 32 houses on the street, which were built between 1728 and 1836. The alley is a National Historic Landmark and the Elfreth’s Alley Museum is located at the numbers 124 and 126.

 

6. Betsy Ross House

How many red lines are there on the flag of the United States of America?

 

By 4net, via Wikimedia Commons

By 4net, via Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

The Betsy Ross House is a historical house where supposedly a flag-maker Betsy Ross (1752-1836) lived when she sewed the first American Flag. Evidence for the precise location of Ross’ home came from verification provided by several surviving family members, although the best archival evidence indicates the house would have been adjacent to the one that still stands today. Although the house is one of the most visited tourist sites in Philadelphia, many historians disagree with the fact that this flag was really the first one.

 

7. Christ Church

How many windows does the church have?

 

By PVSBond, from Wikimedia Commons

By PVSBond, from Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

Christ Church is an Episcopal church in the Old City neighborhood of Philadelphia. Built in 1695 as a parish of the Church of England, it played an important role in the founding of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. From 1754 to 1810, the church’s 196-foot (60 m.) tower was the tallest structure in North America.

 

8. The Liberty Bell

How long is the crack on Liberty Bell?

 

By Flickr user: cliff1066 Philadelphia, via Wikimedia Commons

By Flickr user: cliff1066 Philadelphia, via Wikimedia Commons

Did you know?

The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence. Once placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania Independence Hall, the bell today is located in the Liberty Bell Center. The bell was commissioned in 1752 and was cast with the lettering “Proclaim Liberty Throughout all the Land unto all the Inhabitants Thereof”, a Biblical reference from the Book of Leviticus (25:10). In its early years, the bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens about public meetings.No one recorded when or why the Liberty Bell first cracked, but the most likely explanation is that a narrow split developed in the early 1840’s after nearly 90 years of hard use.

 

9. Independence Hall

How many clocks are there on the Independence Hall?

 

Photo by xiquinhosilva on Foter.com

Photo by xiquinhosilva on Foter.com

Did you know?

In 1776, the Declaration of Independence was signed at Independence Hall. The Second Continental Congress, made up of representatives from all thirteen US colonies, met there. These representatives wrote the Declaration of Independence to let the King of England know what they were displeased with, and that the colonies were going to become their own country. In 1787, the Constitution was drafted at Independence Hall. The summer, when the Constitution was written was very hot. However, the people inside did not open the windows because they didn’t want anyone to hear what they were talking about.

 

10. Park Washington Square

Find the moon tree and read the label engraved under it.

 

Photo by Tony Fischer Photography on Foter.com

Photo by Tony Fischer Photography on Foter.com

Did you know?

Washington Square, originally opened in 1682 as Southeast Square, is now part of Independence National Historical Park. The square was the site of the first human flight in the Americas in 1793 when Jean Pierre Blanchard ascended in his hot-air balloon from the Walnut Street Prison.

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