Your Southern Peru Itinerary

​From the Amazon Rainforest to the Andes Mountains to deep into the forest, this guide will help you arrange your trip to one of the world’s most diverse lands.

 

Every country is unique and has something to offer, but Peru stands with its head high above the crowd. Experience a variety of landscapes such as beaches, lakes, jungles, mountain ranges and deserts – all within the southern part of one country. On top of that, this country in the south of the equator is famous for its handcrafts which include instruments, paintings, jewelery, and more, but what truly stands out are the exquisite and colourful patterns Peruvians weave to create scarves, jumpers, bags, wall decorations an more. It is highly unlikely you will come back home empty-handed.

Nazca

Aside from the obvious reason why people visit Nazca – to fly and get a bird’s eye view of the famous lines – this small town in the middle of the desert has so much more to offer.

After the flight, head over to the adobe pyramids of Cahuachi, which was a mayor ceremonial center. Afterwards, visit Chauchilla Cemetery to admire mummies and intact archeological artifacts. Get adventurous by snowboarding on Cerro Blanco, a one kilometer-high sand dune and the largest in the world. To finish the day, get refreshed by visiting the Cantalloc Aqueducts, also known as “piquious”, and amazing example of Nazca engineering: They were created to bring fresh water from the Andes Mountains into the arid desert, and they still serve that function to date.

 

Huacachina

Located just four hours driving distance from Lima, the capital of Peru, Huacachina has everything an adventurer could ask for. Spend your days and nights surrounded by gigantic sand dunes lining the clear skies. Sand board in the morning and drink local white wine at Tacama Hacienda, the oldest winery in South America in the afternoon.​ Swim in the warm waters of the Oasis of America to finish off the day.

 

Uros Islands

Ever thought of people in this day and age living off almost solely from their natural surroundings? The Uru people are a perfect example of this. And not only that, they also do it in a very unique way! They live in tiny man-made islands made entirely out of reeds. Their houses and furniture? Also made out of reeds. In total, there are eighty seven islands – one for each family – floating on Lake Titicaca. There are also main islands with small restaurants, which are open to visitors and where you can enjoy the famous and scrumptious ceviche Peru is famous for. Aside from the gorgeous and out-of-the-norm views, the waterbed-like feeling on your feet, the Instagram worthy photographs and the delicious food, you will also be able to enjoy the Uru people’s sense of fashion. Bright colours are the norm for their outfits, ranging from greens to pinks and reds – an absolute delight to the eye!

 

Puerto Maldonado

Most people head to Iquitos in search for adventures in the Amazon Rainforest. However, Puerto Maldonado has a lot to offer as well and is much closer to Machu Picchu. Hop on a typical Amazonas boat and explore the Madre de Dios and Tambopata Rivers. Go to Isla de los Monos to spend some time with wild monkeys that roam about freely and commit the occasional robbery (no, seriously, guard your belongings!

 

Just a short boat ride away (plus a hike!) is the Sandoval Lake, where you can bathe in its waters and see a variety of wildlife such as macaws, parrots and Giant Otters.

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